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How We Remember Them - Australian Identity, The ANZACS and War Memorials

Ross, Midalands Tasmania

It’s ANZAC Day once again. Our national day of commemoration for those we lost in the First World War. For generations, war has had a devastating and lasting effect on Australian society.

Each year the community gathers to remember those who fought, those we lost, and grateful for the achievements and stories of all who lived.

As many parents around the country tell their children the ANZAC legend, questions of what they fought for in the first instance are asked; why they fought?

Walgett, North West New South Wales

Walgett, North West New South Wales

There is no universal catch all answer, each man had his own reasons to make that decision. Many enlisted to fight their country, whilst many others saw that they had little choice. Some did it for adventure, some for king and empire, others were forced, shamed, conscripted, whilst others still lied about their age to fight alongside their brothers, friends and countrymen.

Wyandra, South West Queensland

Wyandra, South West Queensland

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More than any other force in Australian history it was unifying. Right or wrong there are countless markers of the Australian identity that were forged during this time in history. Mateship, the laconic "she’ll be right mate" attitude, championing the struggle of the underdog against insurmountable odds, community, ingenuity, the Australian sense of humour and, of course, our fighting spirit.

War memorials are shrines to those we have lost who gave their lives for their countrymen and the ideals for which they embraced. Places of sombre reflection.

Every Australian town has a war memorial of some description. Some quaint and understated, others more prominent in their stature and message. It’s a place of reverence, of remembrance, of reflection and of ritual.

Bendigo, Central Victoria

Bendigo, Central Victoria

Bendigo, Central Victoria

It’s easy to feel as though one may be speaking out of place when invoking the spirits of the ANZACS.

One wants to be balanced whilst also not being seen as insensitive or ignorant.

We are all guilty of it; having an opinion.

There are so many self-appointed representatives of X, Y & Z spewing their self-serving, dismissive, and often destructive and incite-full doctrines, it’s easy to feel as though one just adds to the cacophony ill-informed judgement.

It’s hard to figure out what to say; what one wants to say, what should be left unsaid.

State war memorial - Kings park, perth, western australia

State war memorial - Kings park, perth, western australia

State war memorial - Kings park, perth, western australia

State war memorial - Kings park, perth, western australia

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Now here we are a century later and it seems we still haven’t learnt the lessons that were left for us.

But I feel that many of the diggers would roll in their graves if they bared witness to some of the actions of the treasonous characters that control Australia in modern times.  

Personally, ANZAC Day represents a time to remember the ideal that comes from the tragedy of war. That of never letting it happen again.

A comforting ideal which we have failed miserably in achieving. Through tacit agreement, an overwhelming percentage of the populace eagerly swallow whatever our “leaders” propagate. Blindly allowing the so called elected representatives of the country to defy all logic, not to mention the will of the people, following greed into war time and again.

The human race has the science and resources to end world poverty and raise those the standard of living for all. Wars are fought for nothing more than the greed of the few. If it wasn’t for us pesky humans, “Utopia” is theoretically possible. to quote from Hamlet "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark (Australia)"

From what I can read into the whole situation Australia is under attack from within. A soft corporate coup, where an army of men and women in suits have infiltrated our parliament and sold the country out from underneath us, stifling any and all means of meaningful evolution of our species out of pure self-interest.

We have fallen asleep at the wheel as corporate factions have seized the levers of power and sold the pillars of our society out from underneath us for a steal.

Berry, South Coast New South Wales

140 men enlisted from the municipality of Berry, on the NSW South Coast where you find this monument, the starkest reminder of all to keep an ever-lasting vigil and to not become complacent in our comfort.

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Berry, South Coast New South Wales

Berry, South Coast New South Wales

For many, ideologically, the war isn’t over (with elements believing that the ‘war’ has raged for thousands of year) and to believe otherwise is to have your head in utopic sand.

Think of the soldiers known as Japanese Holdouts whom continued to fight allied forces after the war ended because they refused to believe the veracity of the formal surrender due to dogmatic militaristic principles, or simply were not aware of it because communications had been cut off. Operation Paperclip also comes to mind.

I think a large part of the issue surrounding the climate of fear and apprehension in modern society is due to an impatience at the transformative educational process that surrounds our evolution towards the figurative utopia.

The claiming of a moral high ground through labelling alternative thinking as un-Australian, inferior or offensive, is in itself ironically morally reprehensible.

Uranquinty - Riverina New South Wales

Uranquinty - Riverina New South Wales

Uranquinty - Riverina New South Wales

The puppet masters play us off against one another through manipulating the perception of the Australian identity, or “brand of Australianism", it’s like a cultist religion where each sub culture is comparable to a religious sect, picking and choosing which parts of the Australian identity suit their utopic vision of Nirvanic Australiana.

Cultural cringe ever prevalent, we have a tendency to disown those parts of the wider community whom exhibit practises outside of our faith, almost embarrassed to the point of fear and loathing of that which we don’t understand.

Parkes, Central West new south wales

Parkes, Central West new south wales

Parkes, Central West new south wales

Parkes, Central West new south wales

Parkes, Central West new south wales

French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement, Victor Hugo, is often quoted something to the effect of “There being nothing more powerful than an idea whose time has come”, to which I have heard another scholar counter that it is rather, “second only in power to an idea whose time has not come to an end”.

And so whilst the utopic intention is well-meaning it is not always rooted in the reality of our current point in the timeline of human evolution.

Lest We Forget

Lest - with the intention of preventing (something undesirable); to avoid the risk of.

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beaufort, pyrenees shire, victoria

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